This frame grab from video provided By Yomyat Kzefeh Hawen Fi Dimashq (Diary of a Mortar Shell in Damascus), a Damascus-based media outlet that is consistent with independent AP reporting, shows Syrian residents filling up buckets and... gallons of spring water from a pipe on the side of the road, in Damascus, Syria. Water supplies to Damascus have been largely cut off for nearly two weeks because of fighting between pro-government forces and rebels for control of the main tributary, forcing millions in the Syrian capital to scramble for enough to drink and wash with. The cut-off is a major challenge to the government’s effort throughout the nearly 6-year-old civil war to keep the capital as insulated as possible from the effects of the conflict tearing apart much of the country. (Yomyat Kzefeh Hawen Fi Dimashq (Diary of a Mortar Shell in Damascus), via AP)
The United Nations has denounced the terrorist forces that have cut the Damascus water supply for two weeks now, risking a humanitarian crisis in the city of over five million people.
“In Damascus itself, 5.5 million people have had their water supplies cut or minimized,” head of the UN-backed humanitarian taskforce for Syria, Jan Egeland, told reporters in the Swiss city of Geneva on Thursday.
He stressed that "to sabotage and deny water is of course a war crime," warning that civilians "will be affected by waterborne diseases" if clean water supply is not restored.
The militant held Barada River and Ain al-Fijah spring reportedly supply 70 percent of the water for Damascus and its environs.